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Member news plus local and national philanthropic reporting

  • June 29, 2020 10:00 AM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 29, 2020 by Delaware Public Media) Barclays is a Philanthropy Delaware Member.  Barclays announced Monday it is adding jobs in Delaware. The British Bank is planning a nearly $7 million capital investment to add a new call center at its US consumer business headquarters in Wilmington. 

    The move will create 300 new jobs answering phones along with 23 managerial positions.

    The Delaware Council on Development Finance approved state performance grants to support Barclays’s expansion. The bank will get nearly $2.5 million in taxpayer dollars mostly for capital expenses and employee training.

    Kirk Foreman is President and CEO of the Delaware Prosperity Partnership. He says the new jobs are expected to have a more than $150 million impact to Delaware’s economy.

    “Anytime you can have hundreds of new jobs announced is always a great thing,” said Foreman. “And at a time when our unemployment has spiked and a lot of Delawareans might be shifting to the next thing that’s going to make sense for them, this is a great announcement to have.”

    Barclays is a global bank with 48 million customers and 85,000 employees worldwide and is one of the largest issuers of credit cards in the US. Wilmington has housed its US consumer business headquarters since 2004.

    The bank removed 500 jobs from the site just under one year ago.

    In a statement, Wilmington Mayor Mike Purzycki praised the Barclays’s “continued commitment” to both the city and the state. The Wilmington site was competing for the expansion against Barclays locations at New Jersey, Ohio and Nevada.

    The new project is expected to be up and running in the new year.

    Click here for original article by Delaware Public Media. 

  • June 25, 2020 2:00 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 25, 2020 by Delaware State News) United Way of Delaware announced Wednesday that it has established the Delaware Racial Equity & Social Justice Fund as part of an integrated, statewide effort with other nonprofits, grassroots organizations and the community-at-large to develop and advocate for strategies and policies that address systemic racism in Delaware.

    The fund, which will be housed at and managed by UWDE, is the first action of the newly formed Delaware Racial Equity & Social Justice Collaborative, a group of nonprofits and community-based organizations organized by UWDE as part of a nationwide movement for racial equity and social justice, sparked by the murder of George Floyd and other African Americans. The Fund will be supported through individual, foundation, government and corporate contributions. Donors will be asked to commit time, knowledge, and skills, as well financial resources. Allocation decisions will be made by a community-based steering committee of the Collaborative.

    Those interested in being part of the work of the Delaware Racial Equity & Social Justice Collaborative and/or supporting the Fund may contact Michelle Taylor at mtaylor@uwde.org.


  • June 19, 2020 1:00 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 19, 2020 by Press Release$2.8 million awarded to 128 nonprofits since fund launched March 18 - In its 10th round of grants, the Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund at the Delaware Community Foundation today awarded $335,202 to 24 nonprofit organizations providing services to communities throughout the state.

    Friday’s grants will address a broad range of community needs during the pandemic. Grantees are:

    • St. Michael’s School & Nursery — $28,000 for cleaning supplies and PPE to safely reopen the Wilmington preschool.
    • Latin American Community Center – $25,000 for emergency assistance for families in New Castle County.
    • YMCA – $25,000 to run the Take on Summer teen program at four YMCA branches in Wilmington.
    • Network Delaware – $25,000 for emergency assistance to immigrant families in Sussex County.
    • Kent-Sussex Industries – $25,000 to modify and restart programs supporting the developmentally disabled.
    • Vision to Learn – $20,000 for eyeglasses for low-income children in New Castle County.
    • Holy Rosary Catholic Church Outreach – $20,000 for food for families in Claymont.
    • Delaware First Media – $16,000 for infrastructure and technology to support increased news coverage of COVID-19.
    • Delaware Volunteer Legal Services – $15,442 for technology to provide legal services to clients statewide.
    • Partners for Justice – $15,000 to support social services and legal services to low-income people in New Castle County. 
    • Life Center Complex – $15,000 for technology and staff to provide behavioral telehealth services in New Castle County.
    • The Grand Opera House – $15,000 for a touchless ticketing system to facilitate safe cultural arts activities.
    • Reading Assist Institute – $15,000 to support AmeriCorps members providing one-on-one reading intervention for low-income children in New Castle County.
    • Better Tomorrows – $13,000 for food for families in Wilmington. 
    • Delaware Symphony Orchestra – $12,500 for video editing equipment to facilitate virtual programming.
    • Exceptional Care for Children – $10,388 for cleaning and respiratory therapy supplies for medically fragile children.
    • Big Brothers Big Sisters of Delaware – $10,000 to support e-mentoring statewide.
    • CAMP Rehoboth – $10,000 for communication technology and programming for LGBTQ seniors.
    • Mental Health Association – $6,221 for technology to provide virtual mental health services to clients statewide.
    • Arden Club – $4,000 for equipment to video livestream arts and cultural events.
    • Coastal Concerts – $3,150 to operate the Lewes-based classical music organization.
    • Serenity Place – $3,000 for a freezer for the substance abuse treatment residence in Dover.
    • Delaware Historical Society – $2,000 for technology to facilitate remote work.
    • Lutheran Church of Our Savior – $1,500 for the Rehoboth Beach church to transition its ESL program to a virtual program. 

    In this 10th round of grants, 63 applicants requested $1.8 million from the COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund.

    The fund, which launched on March 18, has awarded $2.8 million to 128 Delaware nonprofits so far. The fund awarded weekly grants March 27-May 22 and two rounds of grants in June.

    New Grants Programs Now Open

    The Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund will continue to award grants at least through the end of 2020.

    The new Community Needs Grants Program and the Vision Grants Program are now accepting applications. For information and to apply, visit delcf.org/covid-grants.

    Double the Impact of Your Gift

    Donations to fund are still needed to respond to community needs, said DCF President & CEO Stuart Comstock-Gay.

    “As the pandemic continues, the needs are growing and evolving,” Comstock-Gay said. “We are calling on the community to help local nonprofit organizations get food, shelter, medical care and other essential services directly to the people who need it most. We also must support our workforce, arts community and other sectors to restore our quality of life post-COVID-19.”

    The Longwood Foundation, which previously gave $1.5 million to the Strategic Response Fund, recently awarded a $500,000 grant, with the stipulation that the DCF must raise a matching $500,000 from the community by Aug. 31.

    To make a gift that qualifies for the match, give at delcf.org/covid19-fund or contact Joan Hoge-North, jhoge-north@delcf.org.

    About the Fund

    The Strategic Response Fund was established to address the state’s emerging and evolving needs resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Grantees are selected through a rigorous process that involves a diverse team of more than 50 community leaders representing all three counties and a range of areas of expertise.

    The fund, which is being directed by Philanthropy Delaware (PD) President Cynthia Pritchard, already includes generous gifts from the Longwood Foundation ($1.5 million), Barclays ($500,000), New Castle County ($500,000), Welfare Foundation ($300,000), CSC ($100,000), Crestlea Foundation ($100,000), Fund for Women ($100,000), Highmark ($100,000), Laffey-McHugh ($100,000), Discover ($75,000), DCF ($75,000), DuPont ($75,000), M&T ($50,000), WSFS Bank ($50,000), JP Morgan Chase ($30,000), Bank of America ($25,000), Capital One ($25,000), TD Bank ($25,000) and others.

    Nearly 300 individual donors have donated $135,000. The DCF also has waived all administrative fees for this fund, so that 100 percent of the funds are going to organizations helping people in need. 

    The Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund is part of the Delaware COVID-19 Emergency Response Initiative, a nonprofit collaborative response to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic. The DCF, DANA, PD and United Way of Delaware are partnering to coordinate charitable resources to maximize impact statewide during this crisis.

    To contribute, visit delcf.org/covid19-fund.

  • June 17, 2020 9:00 AM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 17, 2020 by Sheila Bravo and Cynthia Pritchard - Guest Columnists for Delaware State News

    Nonprofits are institutions solely focused on making communities stronger. This is certainly true of our nonprofits in Delaware. In the toughest times, they do the toughest work. 

    Whether is it rebuilding our communities or restoring the well-being of those they serve, when called upon, nonprofits do the work it takes. Success is measured in terms of shared benefits, not private profits. We need this kind of community-minded perspective to champion the least of us, while promoting the best of us – now more than ever.  

    Nonprofits, when given the resources they need to do their work, improve the quality of our communities. And, in turn, this leads to economic recovery. Right now, our local communities are relying on nonprofit

     partners to address the impacts of COVID-19. We all need the expertise and experience of these community-based institutions in the recovery effort that lies ahead.  

    We need to place great value on the contributions of our nonprofits.

    While businesses, philanthropy and even individuals play a part in supporting our nonprofits, only government can channel public funding into helping provide what nonprofits need to do the work. We ask our policymakers to create positive community change while crafting the Delaware state budget. We ask that they do this by placing special focus on the nonprofit sector – not overlooking it.  (Photo: Cynthia Pritchard)

    Leaders in other states recognize the vital role nonprofits play in recovery efforts and have designated federal stimulus dollars to reimburse nonprofits for the expenses incurred while responding to the pandemic. We ask Gov. John Carney to do the same. 

    The resources we allocate now must also align with our vision for the future: a fair and just society. Our response will only be effective if government funding considers the places and the people who are most impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, those who are left out by our current systems.   (Photo: Sheila Bravo)

    To get this right, everything we do now must take into account the issues that communities were facing before the pandemic. The work we do as nonprofits – and our relationships with our communities – have taught us that a focus on equity must be front and center.

    Because this crisis is far from over, we need the state budget to consider the surge of people who need access to healthy food, resources to help them keep their homes and support systems to help those who struggle with the impacts of COVID-19.

    If state government does not recognize these needs and step up with resources, who will?

    Before the pandemic, nonprofits were contracted by state government at set rates to serve Delawareans in need. There is no negotiation on these rates, despite these rates being far below the actual cost of service. To care for Delaware’s most needy populations, nonprofits had to accept the contracted rates and, subsequently, make up the difference in cost. Before the pandemic, a strong economy helped encourage donations to offset the shortfalls. Now, many nonprofits have exhausted their reserves and their very existence hangs in the balance.

    During the recent shelter-in-place order, Delaware’s philanthropists, businesses and foundations donated millions to pay for food aid, shelter for the homeless, masks and other protective gear, digital access for schoolchildren and additional caseworkers to support those in crisis.

    Now, as we begin to emerge, philanthropy is helping to reinforce nonprofits who are anchors in the community. But philanthropy alone cannot make up the deficit we expect nonprofits will experience with anticipated lower donations and higher demand for services.

    We recognize that state revenues will be tight for this coming year, and we will continue to experience tighter budgets in the near future. Our nonprofits rose to the challenge of COVID-19. They ran into the face of the pandemic and served our state not knowing if they would be resilient enough to sustain their operations when COVID-19 subsided. It is imperative the state recognize the critical nature of our nonprofits and invest in their future.

    Sheila Bravo is president and CEO of the Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement.

    Cynthia Pritchard is president and CEO of Philanthropy Delaware.

    Article published on the Delaware State News. 



  • June 15, 2020 2:41 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 11, 2020 by Ford Foundation) - In response to the existential threat caused by Covid-19 to nonprofit organizations, the Ford Foundation and its Board of Trustees today announced the intent to offer for sale $1 billion of taxable Social Bonds, the net proceeds of which will be used for grantmaking to help sustain and strengthen mission-critical social justice and creative expression organizations. Ford will be the first nonprofit foundation in history to offer a labeled Social Bond in the U.S. taxable corporate bond market. The net proceeds of the bond sale will enable the foundation to pay out more than 10 percent of the value of its total endowment in 2020 and 2021, which is double the level of grantmaking required by law.

    The Ford Foundation joins the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in a collective effort to increase their annual grantmaking. The five foundations anticipate over $1.7 billion of increased funding above normal payouts over approximately two years.

    The Ford Foundation's Social Bonds, Series 2020 (taxable), will be underwritten by joint lead managers Wells Fargo Securities and Morgan Stanley. There will also be a group of diverse co-managers who will participate in the offering. Wells Fargo Securities is additionally serving as the Lead Sustainability Structuring Agent related to the Social Bond designation. The foundation's Social Bonds have been assigned Aaa/AAA credit ratings from Moody's Investors Service and Standard & Poor's, respectively. Sustainalytics has provided a Second Party Opinion on the alignment of the foundation's Social Bond Framework with the International Capital Market Association's Social Bond Principles.

    "We are facing a once-in-a-century crisis, and we must respond in unprecedented ways to sustain organizations that are advancing the fight against inequality at a time when the need is more pressing than ever," said Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation. "The nonprofit sector will be fundamentally upended and diminished by the economic fallout from Covid-19. The proceeds of the Social Bond sale will support and stabilize social justice, human services, arts, and cultural organizations who must be essential voices in influencing the recovery and reimagining a new normal that is more just and inclusive."

    "The market is increasingly focused on socially responsible investing, and the Ford Foundation's bond offering is an excellent opportunity for investors to put money to work in a high-quality credit with an impactful mission," said Sally Bednar, Managing Director at Wells Fargo Securities. "Wells Fargo is honored to bring this ground-breaking financing to market, particularly as it reflects our company's dedication to supporting organizations that support underserved communities."

    Use of Proceeds

    The foundation's primary goal will be to fortify and strengthen key organizations that are advancing the fight against inequality at a time when communities who are most vulnerable have been hit hardest by the pandemic. Offering multi-year, general operating support — which is a signature of the kind of grants Ford provides — to these organizations will help build resilience, durability, and sustainability now and in the future.

    Social justice and nonprofit organizations play a vital role in organizing and advocating on behalf of these communities, but they are already experiencing significant harm from the economic repercussions of Covid-19.

    According to a Nonprofit Finance Fund survey in 2019, only 25% of nonprofits have at least six months of cash reserves on hand. In a recent survey by the Charities Aid Foundation of America, 73% of nonprofits said they have already seen a decline in contributions, and half said they expect to see revenue decline by more than 20% over the next year, while the need for services is expected to increase due to the coronavirus pandemic. Also, economists and fundraising experts predict that the drop in charitable giving will likely be more significant than that of the Great Recession in 2008, and recovery will likely take longer.

    Although an unconventional idea, after reviewing financial analysis and various scenarios, Ford Foundation trustees endorsed the issuance of the social impact bond as an innovative solution that achieved both objectives of increasing resources for grants and not taking capital out of the endowment at a critical time of market volatility.

    Other Information

    The offering of the Social Bonds is not being registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, in reliance on the exemption from registration contained in Section 3(a)(4) thereof. The offering is being made only by means of an offering memorandum.

    For a copy of the preliminary and final offering memorandum, when available, contact: Sally Bednar, Managing Director, Wells Fargo Securities, Sally.bednar@wellsfargo.com (212) 214-2821 and Eric Wild, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley, Eric.wild@morganstanley.com (212) 761-9032.

    This announcement does not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation by any person of an offer to buy, the social Bonds, nor shall there be any sale of the Social Bonds by any person in any jurisdiction in which it is unlawful to make such offer, solicitation or sale.


  • June 12, 2020 2:43 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 12, 2020 by Press Release) Delaware nonprofits invited to apply for Community Needs Grants and Vision Grants The new Community Needs Grants Program and the Vision Grants Program are now open to Delaware nonprofits through the Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund at the Delaware Community Foundation(DCF).

    Through the Community Needs Grants Program, the fund will award monthly grants up to $50,000 to enable nonprofits to better serve Delawareans by providing resources to help them shift to new or modified operating models, or restart or pivot programs in response to COVID-19.

    These grants are not intended for emergency needs. Rather, these grants are intended to support nonprofit sectors through organizations that are sustainable with strong leadership, management and fiscal accountability, as well as solid programmatic outcomes that benefit Delawareans.

    Through the Vision Grants Program, the fund will invest in innovative solutions across a variety of topic areas that address the emerging and evolving needs arising from or exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Vision Grants will support bold solutions, innovative ways of delivering services and programs, address specific social problems, include key partners, and drive broader social or systems changes.

    For full details and to apply, visit delcf.org/covid-grants.

    About the Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund

    A partnership of the DCF and Philanthropy Delaware (PD), the Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund was established to address the state’s emerging and evolving needs resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The fund, which launched on March 18, has awarded $2.5 million to 107 Delaware nonprofits so far. The fund awarded grants each week March 27-May 22 and an additional round on June 9. One more round of grants will be awarded next Friday. The new Community Needs Grants Program and the Vision Grants Program will build on the work to date.

    Grantees are selected through a rigorous process that involves a diverse team of more than 50 community leaders representing all three counties and a range of areas of expertise.

    The fund, directed by PD President Cynthia Pritchard, already includes generous gifts from the Longwood Foundation ($1.5 million), Barclays ($500,000), New Castle County ($500,000), Welfare Foundation ($200,000), CSC ($100,000), Crestlea Foundation ($100,000), Fund for Women ($100,000), Highmark ($100,000), Laffey-McHugh ($100,000), Discover ($75,000), DCF ($75,000), DuPont ($75,000), M&T ($50,000), JP Morgan Chase ($30,000), Bank of America ($25,000), TD Bank ($25,000), WSFS Bank ($25,000) and others. The fund also includes $134,000 from more than 250 individual donors.

    The DCF also has waived all administrative fees for this fund, so that 100 percent of the funds are going to organizations helping people in need. 

    The Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund, is part of the Delaware COVID-19 Emergency Response Initiative, a nonprofit collaborative response to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic. The DCF, Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement (DANA), PD and United Way of Delaware are partnering to coordinate charitable resources to maximize impact statewide during this crisis.

    To contribute, visit delcf.org/covid19-fund. Gifts through Aug. 31 will be matched by the Longwood Foundation up to $500,000.

    About the Delaware Community Foundation 

    The mission of the Delaware Community Foundation is to improve the lives of the people of Delaware by empowering and growing philanthropy through knowledge and relationships, now and in the future. As a facilitator, information resource and manager of charitable funds, the DCF helps communities and philanthropists focus charitable resources for the greatest community benefit statewide. For more information, visit delcf.org or call 302.571.8004.

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  • June 12, 2020 10:38 AM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 10, 2020 by Delaware News Press Release) Fifty-five arts organizations and 11 artists have received relief funds - Earlier this year, the Division of the Arts received $423,600 from the National Endowment for the Arts through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. With this special award and additional federal funds, the Division developed two short-term grant opportunities to help secure jobs and support Delaware’s nonprofit arts organizations and artists that add value to the state’s economy and bolster the creative life of our communities. Of the approximately 60 arts organizations that receive General Operating Support, and an additional 25 community-based arts programs, 55 arts and community-based organizations and 11 artists received relief funds.

    CARES Organization Relief Grants ranged in size from $1,000 to $12,500 and were only available to recipients of General Operating Support (GOS) in the past three years (FY18, FY19, FY20), or Project Support (PS) in the current fiscal year (FY20). The grants were for expenses to support salaried employees, fees for artists and/or contractual personnel, as well as facility costs such as rent and utilities, incurred between March 15 and August 31.

    CARES Artist Relief Grants provided up to $500 to eligible Delaware artists impacted by the cancellation of a specific scheduled event, gig, or opportunity (e.g. commissions, performances, readings, contracts, teaching classes, etc.) because of COVID-19.

    “These relief funds are critical to arts organizations’ and their ongoing service to the community,” said Paul Weagraff, director of the Division of the Arts. “Public funds represent only a small portion of the revenue that arts organizations generate. In addition, individual practicing and teaching artists have seen their opportunities postponed or even canceled due to the social distancing guidelines set forth by the state. Artists’ work in communities, schools and businesses is crucial to the creative life of our communities and adds distinct value to the state’s economy.”

    In addition to the CARES Act relief grants, the Division also released the final General Operating Support grant payments in mid-March (usually dispersed in September) to assist arts organizations with cash flow challenges resulting from cancelled and postponed, revenue generating programming.

    ###

    Contact: Leeann Wallett, Program Officer, Communications and Marketing
    302-577-8280, leeann.wallett@delaware.gov

    Image: “Tides of Change,” acrylics, 36” x 36”, 2019, artist: Shawn Faust

    The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is dedicated to cultivating and supporting the arts to enhance the quality of life for all Delawareans. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. For more information about the Delaware Division of the Arts, visit arts.delaware.gov or call 302-577-8278.


  • June 08, 2020 2:00 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 8, 2020 by Press Release)  In its ninth round of grants, the Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund on Friday awarded $108,760 to 13 nonprofit organizations providing services to communities throughout the state.

    The fund also earmarked $50,000 to create a new initiative to increase equity in Delaware by strengthening smaller nonprofits (operating budgets $250K and under) led by and serving people of color, who are disproportionately affected by the pandemic. Specifics will be determined in the coming weeks.

    Friday’s grants will address a broad range of community needs during the pandemic. Grantees are:

    • Laurel Public Library — $3,900 for a UV sanitation machine for books and materials.
    • Chinese American Community Center — $8,000 to support virtual programming and operations of the facility in Hockessin.
    • Siegel JCC — $16,360 for equipment to facilitate safely reopening the facility in Wilmington.
    • Delaware Zoological Society — $10,000 to support zoo operations and virtual programming.
    • Wilmington & Western Railroad — $5,000 for equipment to facilitate safely reopening the historical railroad.
    • Lewes Public Library — $10,000 for equipment to support virtual programming.
    • Paws for People — $4,000 to support virtual pet therapy and reading programs statewide.
    • Absolutely Flawless Women — $5,000 to provide meals for families in Indian River School District.
    • Freeman Foundation — $10,000 to convert its free, weekly Young Audience Series to a virtual program.
    • Delaware Center for Horticulture — $10,000 to mobilize home gardeners to grow and donate produce statewide.
    • Clear Space Theatre Company — $10,000 to support operations.
    • Merakey IDD — $6,500 for equipment to provide services for individuals with intellectual disabilities at Delaware group homes.
    • Bellevue Community Center — $10,000 to provide fresh produce to underserved families in Wilmington.

    In this ninth round of grants, 51 applicants requested $1.3 million from the COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund, which is housed at the Delaware Community Foundation (DCF).

    The fund, which launched on March 18, has awarded $2.5 million to 107 Delaware nonprofits so far. The fund awarded grants each week March 27-May 22 and paused for a week before awarding Friday’s grants.

    Next Applications Due June 15

    The fund will accept additional grant applications on June 15 at delcf.org/covid-grants.

    The grants have been targeting a combination of immediate needs and broader community needs, including the arts, culture, the environment, workforce development, animal welfare and others.

    The June grants are target nonprofit organizations – both large and small – playing key roles in various sectors, throughout the state.

    While we cannot address the sustainability of every nonprofit organization, the goal of these grants is to strengthen the sustainability of the sectors traditionally upheld by nonprofits, including health and social services, education, the environment, workforce development, animal welfare, the arts, culture and others.

    These grants target solvent nonprofit organizations with solid plans for long-term fiscal sustainability and strong leadership and management. The plans should be responsive to the changing environment for funding, as well as evolving community needs. Organizations with a history of serving populations most affected by the pandemic will be favored.

    New Grants Programs to Be Announced for Second Half of 2020

    The Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund will continue to award grants at least through the end of 2020.

    Two new grants programs will be announced on Friday, June 12 at delcf.org/covid-grants. Details are not yet available.

    Double the Impact of Your Gift

    The council is actively raising money to be able to respond to community needs, said DCF President & CEO Stuart Comstock-Gay.

    “As the pandemic continues, the needs are growing and evolving,” Comstock-Gay said. “We are calling on the community to help local nonprofit organizations get food, shelter, medical care and other essential services directly to the people who need it most. We also must support our workforce, arts community and other sectors to restore our quality of life post-COVID-19.”

    The Longwood Foundation, which previously gave $1.5 million to the Strategic Response Fund, recently awarded a $500,000 grant, with the stipulation that the DCF must raise a matching $500,000 from the community by Aug. 31.

    To make a gift that qualifies for the match, give at delcf.org/covid19-fund or contact Joan Hoge-North.

    About the Fund

    The Strategic Response Fund was established to address the state’s emerging and evolving needs resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Grantees are selected through a rigorous process that involves a diverse team of more than 50 community leaders representing all three counties and a range of areas of expertise. Final decisions are made by the COVID-19 Community Needs Grants Council:

    • April Birmingham, M&T Bank
    • Sheila Bravo, president, Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement (DANA), ex officio
    • Vernita Dorsey, WSFSAlan Levin, SoDel Concepts
    • Leslie Newman, retired CEO, Children & Families First
    • Todd Veale, executive director, Laffey-McHugh Foundation
    • Enid Wallace-Simms, Delmarva Power
    • Amy Walls, Discover Bank

    The fund, which is being directed by Philanthropy Delaware President Cynthia Pritchard, already includes generous gifts from the Longwood Foundation ($1.5 million), Barclays ($500,000), New Castle County ($500,000), Welfare Foundation ($200,000), CSC ($100,000), Crestlea Foundation ($100,000), Fund for Women ($100,000), Highmark ($100,000), Laffey-McHugh ($100,000), Discover ($75,000), DCF ($75,000), DuPont ($75,000), M&T ($50,000), JP Morgan Chase ($30,000), Bank of America ($25,000), TD Bank ($25,000), WSFS Bank ($25,000) and others. The DCF also has waived all administrative fees for this fund, so that 100 percent of the funds are going to organizations helping people in need.

    The Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund is part of the Delaware COVID-19 Emergency Response Initiative, a nonprofit collaborative response to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic. The DCF, DANA, PD and United Way of Delaware are partnering to coordinate charitable resources to maximize impact statewide during this crisis.

    To contribute, visit delcf.org/covid19-fund.

  • June 04, 2020 3:00 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (June 4, 2020 by Delaware State Chamber of Commerce) The Delaware Does More COVID-19 Rapid Response Fund (the Fund), managed by United Way of Delaware (UWDE), today released $100,000 in community investments to help seven community-based organizations across the state serve Delawareans needing food, shelter, utilities and other critical products and services in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Much of the funding has been directed to assist low-income and/or homeless individuals and families. To date, the Fund has released $1,184,750, inclusive of today’s announcement. A seventh round of funding is expected on or around June 18th.

    To date, the Delaware Does More Rapid Response Fund has assisted 75,109 Delawareans in 31,552 households and has funded 1,163,178 meals. The category breakdown of community investments for all six rounds of funding is as follows:

    • Food 41%
    • Housing 34%
    • Utilities 13%
    • Other* 12%

    *Other includes transportation, medical and PPE supplies, employment assistance, technology and technology access.

    Sixth-round recipient organizations (see list below) were selected by a committee of funders including United Way of Delaware, the Santora Group CPAs, Delmarva Power, DuPont, Chesapeake Utilities Corp. and Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Delaware. Recipients were chosen for the strength of their on-the-ground operations in key population areas across the state, and because each has the scope, scale and experience to manage emergency relief efforts.

    Seven Community-Based Organizations Receive Sixth-Round From Rapid Response Fund

    Sixth-round recipients of the Delaware Does More Rapid Response Fund are:

    • Catholic Charities ($25,000): Utilities, housing and behavioral health services for adults, children, seniors, homeless and persons with disabilities, statewide
    • Christina Cultural Arts Center ($5,000): Program materials and supplies for adults in New Castle County
    • Delaware Center for Justice ($15,000): Household products, documents and clothing for adults, statewide
    • Friendship House ($10,000): Utilities and housing for adults, seniors and homeless individuals in New Castle County
    • Goodwill of Delaware ($12,500): Job skills training, employment/placement and support services for adults, seniors, and persons with disabilities in Kent and Sussex counties
    • Jewish Family Services (15,000): Food, utilities, housing, and stay-at-home survival kits for adults, children and seniors in New Castle and Sussex counties
    • Latin American Community Center ($17,500): Food, utilities, and housing for adults and children, statewide

    Corporations, Individuals Support Rapid Response Fund

    A partial list of supporters of the Delaware Does More COVID-19 Rapid Response Fund (to date):

    • Bank of America
    • Barclays
    • Chesapeake Utilities Corporation
    • Delmarva Power, an Exelon Company
    • DuPont
    • Exelon
    • Fund for Women
    • Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Delaware
    • Jessie Ball duPont Fund
    • JPMorgan Chase
    • Longwood Foundation
    • M&T Bank
    • New Castle County Government
    • Procter & Gamble Company
    • Santander Bank
    • Target Corporation
    • United Way of Delaware
    • Wells Fargo
    • Wilmington University
    • WSFS Bank
    • …and hundreds of caring individuals

    Longwood Foundation Offers Rapid Response Fund $250,000 Challenge Grant

    Commenting on the future of the Fund, UWDE President and Chief Executive Officer Michelle A. Taylor said, “Quarantine restrictions are lifting slowly, the weather is warming and it’s tempting to think that COVID-19 will soon be a bad memory. Nothing could be further from the truth. The human toll is incalculable, and with tens of thousands still out of work, hundreds of businesses shuttered and the state’s economy in free fall, the receding virus has revealed a landscape of loss and suffering across Delaware. We expect the Fund will be investing in the community throughout the summer months.”

    To help meet this demand, Taylor said the Longwood Foundation has challenged the Fund to raise an additional $250,000 by August 31, 2020. Taylor said, “The Longwood Foundation will match donor contributions dollar-for-dollar, now through the end of summer, up to $250,000. That means at least an additional $500,000 to help Delawareans still struggling with the long-term impacts of COVID-19. For those who have not yet contributed to the Fund, and for those who wish to dig a little deeper, there has been no better time to give than right now.”

    Those wishing to double the impact of their gift to the COVID-19 Rapid Response Fund may do so in one of three ways:

    • Text the phrase: derapid to 41444
    • Give online at: www.uwde.org/give4covid
    • Send a check to: United Way of Delaware, 625 North Orange Street, Wilmington, DE 19801 (write “Rapid Response Fund” in the note section)

    Rapid Response Fund Background

    Shortly after the initial reports of the COVID-19 outbreak, United Way of Delaware convened a virtual meeting of more than 100 leaders from state government, nonprofits, foundations and community-based organizations to develop a comprehensive, coordinated response to the crisis. One outcome of the meeting was formation of the Delaware COVID-19 Emergency Response Initiative. The Delaware Does More COVID-19 Rapid Response Fund, managed by UWDE, will address near-term demand for financial and other resources; the Strategic Response Fund, managed by the Delaware Community Foundation (DCF), will address some of the operational and capacity needs of nonprofits whose resources are being strained in the current crisis.


  • May 30, 2020 9:45 PM | Philanthropy Delaware (Administrator)

    (May 30, 2020 by Delaware News Desk, Dover PostJPMorgan Chase is a Philanthropy Delaware Member.  JPMorgan Chase committed $300,000 to Delaware Technical Community College to support students, staff and faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The emergency funds will assist Delaware Tech students who are now learning in an online environment stay enrolled and continue to receive high-quality education.

    While Delaware Tech has shifted its coursework online in the wake of stay-at-home orders, some challenges have arisen including access to technology for students. Research from the JPMorgan Chase Institute found that 65% of families don’t have the cash buffer to weather a simultaneous income dip and spike in expenditure like the one resulting from the COVID-19 crisis.

    Delaware Tech will make laptops and Chromebooks available to students in need who are enrolled in credit and short-term certificate programs, allowing them to successfully complete online work.

    JPMorgan Chase’s support will also allow for 38 Delaware Tech faculty members to attend a two-week “virtual boot camp” professional development session with the college’s Center for Creative Instruction and Technology to learn how to develop online master courses to optimize student learning and engagement. Other professional development opportunities for faculty to learn how to best deliver online courses will also be funded by the grant.

    To help students gain employment during challenging times, the grant will include a virtual career fair for Del Tech students and alumni, with emphasis on the healthcare and education fields. Alumni experiencing unemployment will also be able to access career counseling and job placement services through the grant.

    “We are grateful to JPMorgan Chase for once again stepping in to help Delaware Tech provide essential services to our students,” said Del Tech President Mark T. Brainard. “This grant will help our faculty to deliver the high-quality education that our students expect and deserve. And it will allow us to provide our students and alumni with enhanced access to career and employment resources. We know this award will have far-reaching benefits for our state.”

    JPMorgan Chase’s support for Delaware Tech is part of the firm’s $200 million global business and philanthropic commitment to address the humanitarian and economic impact of COVID-19 on underserved, hard-hit communities, including people of color and low-income households across the U.S.

    “JPMorgan Chase has a long history in Delaware and a standing commitment to supporting our employees, customers and communities across the state,” said Tom Horne, Delaware market leader for JPMorgan Chase. “Investing in our youth and ensuring that students can continue to benefit from high-quality education is key to helping make sure the COVID-19 crisis doesn’t widen the economic opportunity gap for the most vulnerable Delawareans.”

    For more on Del Tech’s programs and training opportunities, visit dtcc.edu.

    Click here for article from Dover Post. 

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